More Laquer stripping questions

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ttf_salsabone
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More Laquer stripping questions

Post by ttf_salsabone » Sat Jan 06, 2018 4:16 pm

Sorry about the newbie stripping questions, but I have been learning on some nice older Reynolds trombones.  My newest project will entail a 1958 Reynolds model 77.  A closed wrap F-attch trombone that I also will try to strip the horrible tiger stripe crappy finish that some flipper put on to hide the many dents on the bell flare in the eBay pictures.  My main question is what is the best way to scrape off the old finish after the stripping agent does it's work around the small tuning slide tubes with the close and tight gaps and the delicate outer slide tubes.  I have straight edged scrapers, but they really won't fit into the tight areas of the wrap.  Thanks in advance for your advice!
Kevin
ttf_Doug Elliott
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More Laquer stripping questions

Post by ttf_Doug Elliott » Sat Jan 06, 2018 5:19 pm

In my experience with Citrustrip, it loosens and peels off or dissolves, there no need to scrape anything.  If it doesn't come off the first time, keep reapplying, letting it soak in, and rinsing until it's gone.
ttf_salsabone
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Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2018 11:59 am

More Laquer stripping questions

Post by ttf_salsabone » Sat Jan 06, 2018 5:41 pm

Doug, Thanks for the advice.  I, too, use Citristrip.  I have let it sit an 2 different bells for somewhere between 12 to 24 hours.  In my shortish experience the Citristrip has just not fallen off of the surface of the bells.  It did need some scraping and further effort on my part to be able to clean it off and finish it's job.  I have various tools to accomplish this job, but with the close gaps in an older closed wrap configuration I was just wondering if there were any tricks of the trade to the removal of the old laquer and following clean up and polishing. 
ttf_john jenkins
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More Laquer stripping questions

Post by ttf_john jenkins » Sat Jan 06, 2018 5:57 pm

I just stripped my main horn yesterday. I've used Citrustrip for years and always have had to do a little extra work, unfortunately. What I use for those hard-to-reach areas is a head scarf, slipping one end through a tight spot and pulling each end back and forth over the surface to remove the remaining [loosened] lacquer without scratching the surface. I also use a non-scrap bristle brush to get into crevices. You could also use those wire brushes used to clean straws, etc.
ttf_john jenkins
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Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2018 11:59 am

More Laquer stripping questions

Post by ttf_john jenkins » Sat Jan 06, 2018 5:57 pm

I just stripped my main horn yesterday. I've used Citrustrip for years and always have had to do a little extra work, unfortunately. What I use for those hard-to-reach areas is a head scarf, slipping one end through a tight spot and pulling each end back and forth over the surface to remove the remaining [loosened] lacquer without scratching the surface. I also use a non-scrap bristle brush to get into crevices. You could also use those wire brushes used to clean straws, etc.
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