Lars-Erik Larsson Recording

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ttf_invisiblejew
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Lars-Erik Larsson Recording

Post by ttf_invisiblejew » Thu Jan 18, 2018 2:46 pm

Hey forum, I've been studying and practicing the Lars-Erik Larsson Concertino for solo and ensemble and college auditions, and I came across this one recording on YouTube
 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eq92HzFfnSM. The performer is a man named Per Gade, who was a Danish trombone virtuoso and pedagogue, I thought that his interpretation of this weird piece was something unique to me as a listener and performer, particularly the gliss at the end and the 8vas across the cadenzas. Give it a listen and see what you think.
ttf_hyperbolica
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Lars-Erik Larsson Recording

Post by ttf_hyperbolica » Thu Jan 18, 2018 7:46 pm

I performed this piece in college (35 years ago???) and really fell in love with it. The thing about cadenzas is that they allow a lot of freedom. If you listen to a lot of the standard solo lit for trombone, there are a lot of places where performers will take something up or down an octave, or do a rip where a run is notated, or take any number of freedoms that put a personal stamp on a solo. It's not like doing a big gliss in Tuba Mirem after all. I've done the gliss at the end several different ways. That can be a rip, a gliss, or a triple tongued hard attack. Personally, I like to let the music ebb and flow more than this guy did - meaning faster fasts and slower slows. Same with dynamic range - louder and softer. This piece is a lot of clownish fun, and a little reminiscent in the middle. I think you can't go wrong if you listen to as many recordings as you can and string together the elements that you hear to make your own personality come out. Try it several ways and stick with whatever seems right. Of course work with your teacher. Technically this isn't the best performance of this piece on Youtube, but you're right, it does have some unique elements that might be worth adopting.
ttf_Zandit75
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Lars-Erik Larsson Recording

Post by ttf_Zandit75 » Thu Jan 18, 2018 11:47 pm

This piece was the first time I listened to Ian Bousfield.
The CD I bought has long since disappeared, and it was a mixture of IB playing all of the parts of solos, quartet, sextet & octet pieces, plus some full brass band pieces with the IMI Yorkshire Brass Band behind him.
I wish I still had the CD, it was brilliant. I especially loved the first track, Bolivar by Eric Cook.
I haven't found a recording anywhere near as flamboyant as Ian Bousfields version yet, but this one is pretty close.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u1Qff7OKAs0
ttf_mlarsson
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Lars-Erik Larsson Recording

Post by ttf_mlarsson » Sun Jan 28, 2018 6:24 am

Quote from: invisiblejew on Jan 18, 2018, 02:46PMHey forum, I've been studying and practicing the Lars-Erik Larsson Concertino for solo and ensemble and college auditions, and I came across this one recording on YouTube
 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eq92HzFfnSM. The performer is a man named Per Gade, who was a Danish trombone virtuoso and pedagogue, I thought that his interpretation of this weird piece was something unique to me as a listener and performer, particularly the gliss at the end and the 8vas across the cadenzas. Give it a listen and see what you think.

According to Gades comments, this is referred to as the unpublished (and difficult) version and was written in collaboration with Danish trombone virtuoso Palmer Traulsen.

ttf_Doug Elliott
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Lars-Erik Larsson Recording

Post by ttf_Doug Elliott » Sun Jan 28, 2018 10:56 am

I didn't check the published music against the recording... did you? Is it really much different?  Sounded pretty much the same to me but it's been a long time since I played that.
ttf_mlarsson
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Lars-Erik Larsson Recording

Post by ttf_mlarsson » Sun Jan 28, 2018 12:42 pm

Quote from: Doug Elliott on Jan 28, 2018, 10:56AMI didn't check the published music against the recording... did you? Is it really much different?  Sounded pretty much the same to me but it's been a long time since I played that.

I noticed a couple of 8vas in the first and final movement and a few added lip trills and glisses in the first movement. Second movement unchanged. Traulsen often added octave transpositions, sometimes against the wishes of the composers (as in the case of Gröndahl). Apart from the Gade recording, I also recollect one by Carsten Svanberg, also playing this "Traulsen-version". All other recordings I'm aware of is of the original version.
ttf_Doug Elliott
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Lars-Erik Larsson Recording

Post by ttf_Doug Elliott » Sun Jan 28, 2018 1:59 pm

Some "difficult version"
ttf_Rockymountaintrombone
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Lars-Erik Larsson Recording

Post by ttf_Rockymountaintrombone » Sun Jan 28, 2018 3:29 pm

I seem to remember when I was a student at Juilliard that some of Per Brevig's students did a few 8va's and a rip down to the last note rather than the printed triplet. I believe these were some alterations that had been approved by the composer at the suggestion of one of the prominent Scandinavian trombonists of the day (maybe Per himself?).

Anyway, none of this is a major change to the piece. I generally have played and taught the original version.

Jim Scott
ttf_Rockymountaintrombone
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Lars-Erik Larsson Recording

Post by ttf_Rockymountaintrombone » Sun Jan 28, 2018 3:29 pm

I seem to remember when I was a student at Juilliard that some of Per Brevig's students did a few 8va's and a rip down to the last note rather than the printed triplet. I believe these were some alterations that had been approved by the composer at the suggestion of one of the prominent Scandinavian trombonists of the day (maybe Per himself?).

Anyway, none of this is a major change to the piece. I generally have played and taught the original version.

Jim Scott
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