Teaching middle schoolers

Post Reply
ttf_anonymous
Posts: 0
Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2018 10:09 pm

Teaching middle schoolers

Post by ttf_anonymous » Fri Jan 19, 2018 3:36 pm

I'm a senior in high school auditioning for music schools right now, and I've started to contact local band directors at middle schools to give the trombones there lessons. I've gotten a call back from an 8th grader who wants to be in the marching band next year, even though everyone automatically joins, so I was wondering what kind of rep or material I should go through with him. Lessons are half an hour twice a week, I was thinking starting with basic Remington long tones and lip slurs and focusing on sound production and slide facility, depending on his level. Any thoughts on how I should proceed with this would be appreciated.
ttf_NBee
Posts: 0
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2018 11:58 am

Teaching middle schoolers

Post by ttf_NBee » Fri Jan 19, 2018 4:03 pm

Where is the 8th grader in development? Does he have good fundamentals? Always start out with scales and basic exercises like Rubank or early Arban's. Ask him to bring a solo he's been working on. Once you got a good idea where he is, and you got an idea of his strengths and weaknesses, think about how you worked on what he's struggling with.

The problem right now is there are a lot of unknowns. Until you know more about the student it's hard to give advice.

Keep us updated!
ttf_BGuttman
Posts: 0
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2018 12:15 pm

Teaching middle schoolers

Post by ttf_BGuttman » Fri Jan 19, 2018 4:04 pm

Don't try to get too fancy with Middle Schoolers.  I taught a small group of them.  We went over their Standard of Excellence book.  Sometimes you need to help them with rhythms.  Sometimes you need to introduce a few notes.

A couple of simple duets played with the students can be satisfying.

The Middle School I taught at had the teachers sit in with the band to help the kids fit in.  They really appreciated it.
ttf_itisunknown
Posts: 0
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2018 11:58 am

Teaching middle schoolers

Post by ttf_itisunknown » Fri Jan 19, 2018 6:28 pm

Play simple duets with them so they can learn to match your tone and can sound controlled and pretty when they play.  The biggest leap I made as a kid was a summer of Voxman trombone duets volumes one and two.  Also have them listen to great trombone recordings of simple melodies that they can learn to play along with.   
ttf_Doug Elliott
Posts: 0
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2018 11:59 am

Teaching middle schoolers

Post by ttf_Doug Elliott » Fri Jan 19, 2018 6:38 pm

You need to know what you're working with to plan how to continue.  Start with wherever he is and go from there.  Half an hour twice a week is excellent.
ttf_trombonemetal
Posts: 0
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2018 12:33 pm

Teaching middle schoolers

Post by ttf_trombonemetal » Fri Jan 19, 2018 7:09 pm

Be kind, patient, and listen sincerely to the things they say. Take them and their thoughts about what’s going on with their playing seriously and they will respond in kind. Don’t be just another patronizing old person.
ttf_Joe_Guarr
Posts: 0
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2018 11:53 am

Teaching middle schoolers

Post by ttf_Joe_Guarr » Sat Jan 20, 2018 8:36 am

Middle school teacher here.

In my experience, middle school kids tend to need fundamentals, and repetition. My bands started getting a lot stronger when we committed to things like Remingtons and simple lip slurs every single day. Your role as a teacher should also be to provide a good model characteristic sound to help your young students begin developing a concept of tone. As others have mentioned, playing duets with your student is a great way to do this.

And just in general...be enthusiastic and have fun. Show them that the trombone is an awesome instrument.
ttf_invisiblejew
Posts: 0
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2018 11:57 am

Teaching middle schoolers

Post by ttf_invisiblejew » Mon Jan 22, 2018 5:23 pm

Thanks for all of the responses, everybody. The first lesson just finished and I must say, I have an increased respect for educators, especially my previous musical ones. Teaching is most definitely a calling, and it's a form of communication that not everyone can succeed at. With that being said, I think the lesson went well and I got an idea of where he is and what we can work on. We just worked on mouthpiece buzzing, long tones and lip slurs today, and I have ideas about exercises that I would like to work on with him. He has a good idea of how to buzz, but he struggles to take in enough air and to push it all out for that beautiful trombone sound. (Not to mention puffing cheeks) As he goes further out he goes between intervals and sometimes he can create a round sound when he concentrates his air. Overall I think it's just gonna take time, if you guys have any other thoughts please let me know.
ttf_B0B
Posts: 0
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2018 12:00 pm

Teaching middle schoolers

Post by ttf_B0B » Mon Jan 22, 2018 5:58 pm

Quote from: invisiblejew on Jan 19, 2018, 03:36PMLessons are half an hour twice a week, I was thinking starting with basic Remington long tones and lip slurs and focusing on sound production and slide facility, depending on his level. Any thoughts on how I should proceed with this would be appreciated.Does the student get to play any etudes or songs, or just basic note and articulation studies?

Keep in mind, a big real we playing a musical instrument and work on those tone/articulation/scale studies is to make music. That is the ultimate goal, and should have a place in the lesson.
ttf_B0B
Posts: 0
Joined: Sat Mar 31, 2018 12:00 pm

Teaching middle schoolers

Post by ttf_B0B » Mon Jan 22, 2018 5:58 pm

Quote from: invisiblejew on Jan 19, 2018, 03:36PMLessons are half an hour twice a week, I was thinking starting with basic Remington long tones and lip slurs and focusing on sound production and slide facility, depending on his level. Any thoughts on how I should proceed with this would be appreciated.Does the student get to play any etudes or songs, or just basic note and articulation studies?

Keep in mind, a big real we playing a musical instrument and work on those tone/articulation/scale studies is to make music. That is the ultimate goal, and should have a place in the lesson.
Post Reply

Return to “Pedagogy”