Yamaha 350C

Post Reply
hyperbolica
Posts: 1936
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 7:31 am

Yamaha 350C

Post by hyperbolica »

I scored the instrument that has been on ebay the last several weeks. I have some upcoming travel, and this looks like the perfect horn for that. The Schiller equivalent would have been about half price, but the case isn't as nice, I prefer the string linkage over the mechanical , and it's a Schiller instead of a Yamaha.

For those of you who either own or have owned one of these or a Chinese equivalent, what are the notes you give up? They're below the staff, right? E, Eb, Db?

And also the positions in C are slightly short, so B on the staff is short trigger 2? The lower partial with the trigger puts bottom line G in 1st position? Low F is short trigger 3? And of course you get the pedal low C.

I'm excited to get my grubby hands on it. It's lighter, and should be able handle anything aside from bass parts. Plus I can use it as a template for a bass conversion project I have been considering.
User avatar
ithinknot
Posts: 490
Joined: Fri Jul 24, 2020 3:40 pm

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by ithinknot »

hyperbolica wrote: Sat Apr 30, 2022 8:36 am The lower partial with the trigger puts bottom line G in 1st position? Low F is short trigger 3? And of course you get the pedal low C.
No, you're an 8ve out - there's no partial there. C in the staff, then pedal C.
hyperbolica
Posts: 1936
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 7:31 am

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by hyperbolica »

ithinknot wrote: Sat Apr 30, 2022 9:30 am
No, you're an 8ve out - there's no partial there. C in the staff, then pedal C.
Ok, yeah, right. Pedal c, c on the staff, top space g. And a gap between f right under the staff and low c.
User avatar
Matt K
Posts: 2605
Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2018 10:34 pm
Contact:

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by Matt K »

Thank you so much for buying that because it was very much tempting me and I don't have the budget for it at the moment :lol:
dcslideman
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2022 4:57 pm

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by dcslideman »

I too have been fascinated by this idea. I know it is marketed for students who can't reach 6 and 7, but it seems like there is so much more potential for lead and first trombone parts that don't need an F attachment or want the weight. I know the Yamaha "student" horns are really good, but why isn't some company putting out premium horns with this? I bet there are a lot of pros who could do things with this I can't even think of.

I also thank hyperbolica for taking the temptation away. With several recent purchases, I need to lay low a bit.
hyperbolica
Posts: 1936
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 7:31 am

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by hyperbolica »

There were some German horns with this layout, and a couple of people have made basses based on the concept, which is what I intend to do.

For those tempted, there is still the Schiller /jinbao copy still available at a low price.
User avatar
BGuttman
Posts: 4574
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2018 7:19 am
Location: Cow Hampshire

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by BGuttman »

Orchestral trumpet players use C trumpets a lot. Makes dealing with the sharp keys so popular in orchestral music much easier to handle. I have often wondered why we trombone players didn't adopt a C trombone for orchestral use as well.

Up to now, the only C trombones were "Preacher" models, used to allow you to play directly from a hymnal (at least that was the reason they were sold -- I haven't figured out why that was a reason). There were C trombones with Bb attachments, but the change was with a manual valve (no spring or lever: you turn it one way or another).
Bruce Guttman
Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Orchestra
"Almost Professional"
User avatar
harrisonreed
Posts: 3293
Joined: Fri Aug 17, 2018 12:18 pm
Location: Yokohama, Japan
Contact:

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by harrisonreed »

That's what this Yamaha trombone is. It's a "preacher" style trombone -- Doug Yeo had a nice description of it directly below the original Conn Preacher model on his old site. It's been around for a while now. Kids use these a lot in elementary school here in Japan, and I'll be darned if they don't sound just like a full size trombone.

As to your question about why this was done, Bruce,, Doug Yeo writes:

"The Conn "Preacher Model" is in C, but has a valve which can be turned by hand which will put the trombone in B flat. The reason for this is really quite simple: if a person was accustomed to reading music for trombone in B flat treble clef, they could read music written in C treble clef, put the trombone in C and then read music as if it were in B flat and have it sound in concert pitch. Hence, the name "Preacher Model" - the preacher could lead music from the pulpit with his trombone, playing out of the hymnal. The instrument is in beautiful condition, very small, and a gem of Conn's innovative instrument development."

Check out his page, it's got a ton of weird trombones listed. You could probably use the Yamaha the same way, but it would get annoying holding down the trigger the entire time. If there was a quick way to reverse the valve's "open" setting, you could stay in C and have the Bb valve for notes that are too low.
Last edited by harrisonreed on Sat Apr 30, 2022 7:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
BGuttman
Posts: 4574
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2018 7:19 am
Location: Cow Hampshire

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by BGuttman »

I get what you are saying, Harrison. But nowadays we don't learn transposed treble clef. I learned to read C treble clef to use Fake Books and read hymnals. And I was coming from bass clef, so it was all new to me.

I still think the C trombone for orchestral use is a nice idea. 5 sharps becomes a lot more manageable.
Bruce Guttman
Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Orchestra
"Almost Professional"
User avatar
harrisonreed
Posts: 3293
Joined: Fri Aug 17, 2018 12:18 pm
Location: Yokohama, Japan
Contact:

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by harrisonreed »

BGuttman wrote: Sat Apr 30, 2022 7:30 pm I get what you are saying, Harrison. But nowadays we don't learn transposed treble clef. I learned to read C treble clef to use Fake Books and read hymnals. And I was coming from bass clef, so it was all new to me.

I still think the C trombone for orchestral use is a nice idea. 5 sharps becomes a lot more manageable.
Yeah, that's true, especially for beginners. Especially since it solves a problem that doesn't really exist if we just learn to read treble in C.

But I think most people who learn tenor clef would have little trouble applying it to reading Bb treble (add two flats). If you spend enough time around marches you eventually start getting handed parts that are in "trumpet clef", and I think it's a valuable skill to have. If I had one of these Yamahas and wanted to easily sub in on church gigs, I might actually think about using it that way -- my Bb treble reading ability is far better than reading C treble and having to transpose down an octave on top of that.
User avatar
Finetales
Posts: 494
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 12:31 pm
Location: Los Angeles
Contact:

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by Finetales »

dcslideman wrote: Sat Apr 30, 2022 5:07 pmwhy isn't some company putting out premium horns with this? I bet there are a lot of pros who could do things with this I can't even think of.
They have done so in the past. I'm not sure if there are any current examples, but Thein used to offer a tenor with ascending C valve, with the option of adding an F attachment to that as well. There was a handy graphic showing the positions in C against the positions in Bb, and how with a full-length slide you get 8 positions in C!

One of the Voigts (I can't remember which) made an orchestral tenor with an ascending C valve and a DEPENDENT F valve, which meant you could use either valve on its own, but not both at the same time. I always figured this was the ideal trombone for someone who plays solos and new music, in addition to the standard orchestral repertoire. With the dependent setup, you get a normal Bb/F trombone with the addition of low C and B in an easy 1st and 2nd, and a supercharged high register on the C side (Bolero, Symphonie Fantastique, Also Sprach, etc. would probably be noticeably easier being able to play high C and above one partial lower!).

With the valves independent, obviously you now have a whole different beast more suited for bass trombonists. You get Bb, F, C, and G positions, while having a much lighter instrument than a typical double-valve bass. The only disadvantage would be you can only play low D and Db in the F-valve positions, but that's easily manageable.
User avatar
Matt K
Posts: 2605
Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2018 10:34 pm
Contact:

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by Matt K »

The overlap of people who play commercially and like valves seems to be fairly small. Even rotaries require a little maintainance which you don't need with a straight horn. So I'd suggest the reason we don't see C/Bb in smaller bores (the 350C is basically a smaller version of the 356 as far as I can tell; 500/525 slide, 8" bell) is that we dont' really need to use the valve to make any of the notes that a C trombone would give you more accessible. Then from a utility perspective, if you are a comercial player and use a valve, you probably want access to the lower registers that an F attachment gives you for the times you need to honk out on an occasional not-a-bass-trombone-part-but-has-notes-down-there chart.
peteedwards
Posts: 68
Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2018 5:43 am
Location: York County PA

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by peteedwards »

a few years ago I built a bass trombone in Bb/F with ascending C valve- posted on the old TTF forum & archived here- lots of background info:

https://www.trombonechat.com/viewtopic.php?f=57&t=2082

The horn is a hoot to play, most recently played it in a pit orchestra for the Spongebob Musical.
I actually think a King 3BF in this setup would be the ultimate pit horn, perfect for cramped spaces, light slide, perfect balance, a whole host of alternate positions.
You could also add an F valve to the 350C fairly easily.
Add a screw bell & it will fit in a violin case. My mini-bass fits in a viola case.
User avatar
soseggnchips
Posts: 65
Joined: Fri Jan 29, 2021 10:28 am
Location: UK

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by soseggnchips »

That mini-bass is awesome! Love the idea of having the low C and B as pedal notes.
User avatar
Finetales
Posts: 494
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 12:31 pm
Location: Los Angeles
Contact:

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by Finetales »

peteedwards wrote: Sun May 01, 2022 7:35 am I actually think a King 3BF in this setup would be the ultimate pit horn, perfect for cramped spaces, light slide, perfect balance, a whole host of alternate positions.
Don't give me any ideas, I'm already planning a "normal" 2-valve 3B!
hyperbolica
Posts: 1936
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 7:31 am

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by hyperbolica »

peteedwards wrote: Sun May 01, 2022 7:35 am a few years ago I built a bass trombone in Bb/F with ascending C valve- posted on the old TTF forum & archived here- lots of background info:

https://www.trombonechat.com/viewtopic.php?f=57&t=2082

The horn is a hoot to play, most recently played it in a pit orchestra for the Spongebob Musical.
I actually think a King 3BF in this setup would be the ultimate pit horn, perfect for cramped spaces, light slide, perfect balance, a whole host of alternate positions.
You could also add an F valve to the 350C fairly easily.
Add a screw bell & it will fit in a violin case. My mini-bass fits in a viola case.
Yeah, your posts were the inspiration here. It has taken me some time, but I've acquired a donor horn (Wessex super tenor) and an extra valve, some tubing, and now this template horn to get some measurements from, but also because I'd like to have a tenor and a bass... I don't know if I'll go for the screw bell, but I'm going to have TIS. It has taken a while, but should be fun. I'm doing it not only for the fun, but also because of some shoulder problems, lighter horns will keep me playing.
droffilcal
Posts: 60
Joined: Wed Aug 08, 2018 9:41 am

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by droffilcal »

Finetales wrote: Mon May 02, 2022 2:16 pm
peteedwards wrote: Sun May 01, 2022 7:35 am I actually think a King 3BF in this setup would be the ultimate pit horn, perfect for cramped spaces, light slide, perfect balance, a whole host of alternate positions.
Don't give me any ideas, I'm already planning a "normal" 2-valve 3B!
Glenn Ferris played a 2-valve King 3B before he switched to the Inderbinden - there's a bunch of stuff with him playing the 3B on youtube. He is a great great player, sounds awsome.
hyperbolica
Posts: 1936
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 7:31 am

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by hyperbolica »

Here I go hijacking my own thread. Here's a video of Glenn Ferris on something that sounds like a tenor and clearly has two valves. Interesting.

hyperbolica
Posts: 1936
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 7:31 am

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by hyperbolica »

Ok, just to add some data to what's been said about this instrument. I got it today. The case is nice. Small, luggage type latches. The horn itself is in good shape. Slide is very good. I gave it a corona bath as soon as I took it out of the case, as it came from downstate NY. Sprayed with alcohol swabbed with dish washer soap.

The trigger grip is not small, but the trigger lever itself is kind of long, and my thumb touches my face. Not terrible, it will remind me to trim my beard.

In the picture, the case is sitting next to a normal old Conn case, and the 350c is next to a 79h. You can see the difference in size. It's bigger than an alto in length.

Playing wise, this is just like most other Yamahas I've played. Very un-exciting. It's... fine. It kind of fights you, but not so much that it's hard to play. Its just a little dull. Midrange sounds a little muddy unless you zing it with accents and hard articulation. The C size of the horn would be nasty if that was the default way you played it.

The Yamaha thing is just not for me. It isn't a 79h, 32h, 6h, 16m, 3b or anything else I'm familiar with. But it doesn't have to be, and there still might be some reasons to pull this thing out at a gig. First would be novelty. It's pretty cool. Second would be playing in a tight spot, or traveling. It's fine on the staff and above. Wouldn't use it below the staff. I don't want to start a Conn vs Yamaha flame war, I just don't get excited about how small Yamahas play. It's that extra bit of resonance and on this one, it's missing some upper overtones I think.

You can use it and forget that you're playing a kids novelty horn. It has a usable 6th position. It doesn't beat out my Olds Recording for character, or my 48h for playability or my 79h for all-aroundedness. But it's an interesting small horn. If that's what you've always played, I'm sure you're not looking for what I'm looking for.

If I had bought it as a kids horn, I'd be ecstatic with it. If I had bought it as a flexible pro horn, I might have been a little disappointed. As a novelty, it definitely delivers, and it plays well, it just doesn't make me really happy to play it.

It was on ebay for $500, and he got a lot of action, but he had a reserve on it, so no sales. I had to go well above $500 to get him to sell it.

Image
Crazy4Tbone86
Posts: 871
Joined: Tue Jan 14, 2020 10:52 am

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by Crazy4Tbone86 »

hyperbolica wrote: Fri May 06, 2022 1:57 pm Playing wise, this is just like most other Yamahas I've played. Very un-exciting. It's... fine. It kind of fights you, but not so much that it's hard to play. Its just a little dull. Midrange sounds a little muddy unless you zing it with accents and hard articulation. The C size of the horn would be nasty if that was the default way you played it.
Image
This description makes a lot of sense to me. If you think about it, the majority of what a person would be playing on this horn is probably with the valve tubing engaged (on the B-flat side). Let’s think about how our tenor trombones (and basses too) would play if we were to have the valve engaged 95-97% of the time across all registers……it would be stuffy and finicky even on the best of horns.

Thanks for the detailed description!
Last edited by Crazy4Tbone86 on Wed May 11, 2022 6:21 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Brian D. Hinkley - Player, Teacher, Technician and Trombone Enthusiast
User avatar
Matt K
Posts: 2605
Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2018 10:34 pm
Contact:

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by Matt K »

Is the bell the same size as a normal tenor bell? It’s hard to tell from the picture. It looks like it might be which surprises me a little.

You probably don’t have much of an intention of taking a torch to it but if that were mine, I’d probably put a Bach or Bach-ish pipe in it. Maybe a shires 1 or 1.5. My 356 I intended to do that and ended up selling the bell when I got a king 3B that suited me a little better but I had used one in the past and found it to liven it up. I had a sterling 32H replica that didn’t quite get there but I suspect it may have in yellow brass.
hyperbolica
Posts: 1936
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 7:31 am

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by hyperbolica »

Yeah, the bell is 8". I'm not going to torch it. Absolutely uninterested in fixing this horn. I will probably use it as a template for a bass. Based on how this plays, I'll probably put bigger valves and tubing on the bass.
User avatar
Matt K
Posts: 2605
Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2018 10:34 pm
Contact:

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by Matt K »

I walked right into that one :lol: I meant is the length of the bell the same as the length of a "normal" tenor bell?
timothy42b
Posts: 1166
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:51 am
Location: central Virginia

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by timothy42b »

I was thinking this might make a nice C/A horn, the famous or infamous minor 3rd trigger, but now that I see the layout I guess that would be hard to do.
hyperbolica
Posts: 1936
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 7:31 am

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by hyperbolica »

@mattk
The straight line distance from the rim to the stem ferrule is about 18.5 inches on both, so it probably is a standard Yamaha bell.
hyperbolica
Posts: 1936
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 7:31 am

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by hyperbolica »

I went back and tried this with some different mouthpieces. From a DE 104c2 to a 104g5, and it seems to respond best to a 104f4. My original test was on a c2. I think I could practice my ear into submission, as long as I only played the 350c/f4 combination for a few weeks without another horn to use as a reference.

Regardless of the mouthpiece, it's not as easy to jump partials as with other horns, and the high notes just lack the sparkle, I think you can say. But that's kind of a nuanced argument, and it's really not that bad. The more I play it, the smaller my argument becomes. With a bigger mouthpiece, it plays more like the lower slide bore (525), and with the smaller mouthpiece, it takes on the less nice characteristics of small bore (500) horns.

Also, I played it for a while with the trigger engaged - so on the straight C side, and it just sounds like a bad small bore horn. It was definitely designed to get the best results in Bb, although I would put a bigger valve on it, and it might be a horn you couldn't argue with.

With all of the weight removed from the back of the horn and that heavy bell, it does get a bit front heavy, which wears on your wrist and fingers a little, but there are creative ways to add mass to the back of the horn.

The more I play it the more I like it, and picking a better size mouthpiece also really helps. Also you can set your trombone stand much lower, so it's very stable on the stand, and looks like a little alto sitting there. Fun horn to play Rochut.
Last edited by hyperbolica on Sat May 07, 2022 7:06 pm, edited 2 times in total.
dcslideman
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2022 4:57 pm

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by dcslideman »

Thanks hyperbolica for the reports! I really like this concept. My secret hope is that my 3 year old grandaughter who is destined to be petite shows an interest in trombone. ("Honey, I have to buy it, its for Ellie") I wish Yamaha or another company would do some work to get the "sparkle" and responsiveness and improve the valve. It really could be something great, I think. There are lots of parts where C and B on the staff are all you really need a trigger for. Then you could optimize the horn for pro-level small-bore playing (although I am far from a pro).
hyperbolica
Posts: 1936
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 7:31 am

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by hyperbolica »

dcslideman wrote: Sat May 07, 2022 2:34 pm Thanks hyperbolica for the reports! ... I wish Yamaha or another company would do some work to get the "sparkle" and responsiveness...
Putting a Thayer on it would open it up, but would defeat the lightweight aspect. Maybe one of those X wraps with a nice Instrument Innovations rotary would do the trick. That might make it a pro horn. But to be a full-on pro tenor, it would need a real f valve as well.
User avatar
Matt K
Posts: 2605
Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2018 10:34 pm
Contact:

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by Matt K »

Awesome, thanks for the update on that. Very interesting about the bell length. Makes me very curious if something like a 3BF would make a good conversion candidate...

I suspect there may be several issues with a Thayer on this. For starters, that loop is pretty small; I'm not sure how that would translate to a Thayer valve or if it would necessarily be too long to get the bends right. The other is that .562 is the smallest Thayer I'm aware of being able to acquire which would be a lot bigger than what I suspect is .530 bore at the moment so it might require re-tapering or getting a new neckpipe. The latter is not insurmountable by any means though. Bigger valve of any variety might cause similar issues but be easier to implement... be it an II/Rotax etc. or Hagmann or something. For your bass project that point, obviously only the limitation of the amount of tubing necessary would be an issue.

With regards to it lacking sparkle or livelieness, that is not unique to this particular model but something that is commonly mentioned about Yamahas in general. It may be more noticeable on this model though. If this is like other Yamahas, it is a one-piece bell but with an unsoldered bell bead and probably on the heavy side. One-piece bells do tend to work better with Thayers for me. With rotors, I tend to like two-piece bells with the soldered bell bead (think like a King 3B). But nothing that wouldn't require a torch. Point being that I suspect that this criticism of the horn would also apply to a straight Bb of similar specifications. Another C/Bb horn with different specs will probably, if anything, be more on the lively side of things than not, in my opinion.
User avatar
Doug Elliott
Posts: 2080
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2018 10:12 pm

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by Doug Elliott »

I may be able to reduce the stuffiness and bring out some sparkle with a backbore change. Tell me which cup you think you'd prefer on it and I'll send something.
Jimkinkella
Posts: 202
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 11:43 am
Location: Los Angeles

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by Jimkinkella »

Changing up mouthpiece proportions helps, but that horn as stock is pretty bland.

It's actually easier to make it feel and sound big and dark than what you would expect out a horn that short looking with a 500 top tube.

On the plus side, the basic idea does take very well to modifications, so you can get it to do what you want, it just takes a while...

(I do have one, and over the years have changed a bunch of stuff)
hyperbolica
Posts: 1936
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 7:31 am

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by hyperbolica »

Jimkinkella wrote: Sun May 08, 2022 11:17 am Changing up mouthpiece proportions helps, but that horn as stock is pretty bland.

It's actually easier to make it feel and sound big and dark than what you would expect out a horn that short looking with a 500 top tube.

On the plus side, the basic idea does take very well to modifications, so you can get it to do what you want, it just takes a while...

(I do have one, and over the years have changed a bunch of stuff)
@jimkinkella, Well.... Don't leave us hanging. What have you done?

I agree it's easier to sound dark on this than expected.

I also notice the trigger C kind of jumps out at you. I'm subconsciously used to the trigger C being a little dialed back, but on this horn it jumps out slightly. You can compensate for it when you expect it.

Doug, I think I get the best head start with the F cup. I've got the F4 shank. I'm interested to see what you would do.
hyperbolica
Posts: 1936
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 7:31 am

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by hyperbolica »

Doug Elliott wrote: Sun May 08, 2022 10:56 am I may be able to reduce the stuffiness and bring out some sparkle with a backbore change. Tell me which cup you think you'd prefer on it and I'll send something.
I'd like to change my answer. E3 - but - and don't judge me for this - I used a Parker stainless rim. The stainless rim really lightens the sound.

There's something odd going on. There are multiple layers to the sound. Smaller mouthpieces lighten part of it, but at the same time there's a drag on the articulation that just feels like the valve. Maybe the leadpipe would have some effect, but I don't wanna go there without real success.
Jimkinkella
Posts: 202
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 11:43 am
Location: Los Angeles

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by Jimkinkella »

hyperbolica wrote: Sun May 08, 2022 12:50 pm
@jimkinkella, Well.... Don't leave us hanging. What have you done?
Well, I started off with a great deal on a used horn...

Swapped out the bell for a 7-1/2" Holton and put a screw ring on it
Changed the tuning slide to match ( I think it's a 2b)
Swapped out the lower .525 tube for a .500
Pulled the leadpipe, so far my favorite is a brassark 32h seamed copper

I play a DE XT101 C+ D3 on it, as well as most of the rest of my small bores

The thing fits in a violin case now, stupidly convenient

The whole cost ended up about the same as a new one from the factory.

It's not the best .500 horn that I have, but I'm perfectly comfortable taking it on gigs, and it's super easy to take on a plane.
hyperbolica
Posts: 1936
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 7:31 am

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by hyperbolica »

Interesting. I can see the bell and leadpipe being good changes. Might add a small counterweight too. I'd probably prefer to keep the 525 slide.

Thanks for that.
Jimkinkella
Posts: 202
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 11:43 am
Location: Los Angeles

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by Jimkinkella »

hyperbolica wrote: Sun May 08, 2022 8:45 pm Interesting. I can see the bell and leadpipe being good changes. Might add a small counterweight too. I'd probably prefer to keep the 525 slide.

Thanks for that.
Honestly I'd pull the leadpipe first, a better or different leadpipe will give you a bunch more useable options for mouthpieces as well as sounding a bit different.
The bell second, the stock bell is functional but super generic. Whatever you flare you plug into it should work as expected. You will need to check and possibly modify the length of the bell flare to maintain tuning.
I changed out the lower slide tube because I'll sit in with rock and blues bands when I travel, and the .525 tube was a bit dark and the sound would just get lost in a louder environment. The stock tube should work fine for church / wind band kind of stuff.
Have fun frankenhorning!
User avatar
Matt K
Posts: 2605
Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2018 10:34 pm
Contact:

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by Matt K »

hyperbolica wrote: Sun May 08, 2022 8:45 pm Interesting. I can see the bell and leadpipe being good changes. Might add a small counterweight too. I'd probably prefer to keep the 525 slide.

Thanks for that.
If you need a tuning slide with a cross brace, I have a spare that should work. I can get it to you at a good price and if it doesn’t work happy to take back
hyperbolica
Posts: 1936
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 7:31 am

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by hyperbolica »

Matt K wrote: Wed May 11, 2022 12:51 pm

If you need a tuning slide with a cross brace, I have a spare that should work. I can get it to you at a good price and if it doesn’t work happy to take back
I'll probably Solder something on like an Olds Ambassador weight.
peteedwards
Posts: 68
Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2018 5:43 am
Location: York County PA

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by peteedwards »

of course you could counterweight it with something useful, like an F-attachment
User avatar
Matt K
Posts: 2605
Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2018 10:34 pm
Contact:

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by Matt K »

Thats an awesome idea. Would look really slick with how little bracing there is.
hyperbolica wrote: Wed May 11, 2022 4:59 pm
Matt K wrote: Wed May 11, 2022 12:51 pm

If you need a tuning slide with a cross brace, I have a spare that should work. I can get it to you at a good price and if it doesn’t work happy to take back
I'll probably Solder something on like an Olds Ambassador weight.
hyperbolica
Posts: 1936
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 7:31 am

Re: Yamaha 350C

Post by hyperbolica »

peteedwards wrote: Wed May 11, 2022 5:38 pm of course you could counterweight it with something useful, like an F-attachment
I'm going to do a bass like yours, but with dual bore TIS (547/562) and a smaller 9" bell. I'm not clear about my plans for the 350c. I've got enough horns, my big lack right now is a mini bass.
Doug Elliott wrote: Sun May 08, 2022 10:56 am I may be able to reduce the stuffiness and bring out some sparkle with a backbore change. Tell me which cup you think you'd prefer on it and I'll send something.
Doug surprised me with an E3* shank while I was off in Vegas for a week. This shank allows me to play a larger cup while getting a brighter sound. Overall, it's a great solution. To an extent, bigger mouthpieces are more comfortable, but the danger is getting too woofy, which is definitely a problem with the 350c.

The sound still has that "covered" tendency, but I think I could get used to it. Although playing it back to back with first a Recording (which is similar in a lot of ways) and a 48h, which is brighter and more direct, you get a sense for it's place in the continuum of trombone sounds.
Post Reply

Return to “Instruments”