Jazz method book

How and what to teach and learn.
Post Reply
jpwell
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri May 11, 2018 11:52 am

Jazz method book

Post by jpwell » Thu Oct 07, 2021 5:32 pm

So the melodious études bordoni book is the goto book for classical music, is there a jazz method book?? High School level for trombone thx
User avatar
robcat2075
Posts: 618
Joined: Mon Sep 03, 2018 2:58 pm

Re: Jazz method book

Post by robcat2075 » Thu Oct 07, 2021 8:58 pm

This thread offered some possibilities, although none is a "go-to"...

https://www.trombonechat.com/viewtopic ... 11&t=20936
>>Robert Holmén<<

Hear me as I play my horn

See my Spacepod movie
jpwell
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri May 11, 2018 11:52 am

Re: Jazz method book

Post by jpwell » Thu Oct 07, 2021 9:28 pm

Thx a good start
afugate
Posts: 406
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 5:47 am
Location: Oklahoma City

Re: Jazz method book

Post by afugate » Fri Oct 08, 2021 7:12 am

jpwell wrote:
Thu Oct 07, 2021 5:32 pm
So the melodious études bordoni book is the goto book for classical music, is there a jazz method book?? High School level for trombone thx
If you're looking for some basics, the Raph book will help you understand how to interpret what's on the written page. This is especially useful for ensemble work, e.g., playing in a jazz band.

The Snidero books and accompanying CDs are good tunes and excellent aural references. I highly recommend both.
--Andy in OKC

This is a snippet from the other thread RobCat2075 mentioned...
JLivi wrote:
Thu Jun 17, 2021 1:08 pm
CalgaryTbone wrote:
Thu Jun 17, 2021 9:46 am
To address a different skill for young jazz performers, Alan Raph wrote an etude book called "Dance Band Reading" (or something similar). Good book to work through for working on reading charts.

Jim Scott
This book is phenomenal!

Also, I use the skills learned in Alan Raph's book and apply them to Jim Snidero's jazz conception etude book
Last edited by afugate on Mon Oct 11, 2021 1:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
harrisonreed
Posts: 2848
Joined: Fri Aug 17, 2018 12:18 pm
Location: Yokohama, Japan
Contact:

Re: Jazz method book

Post by harrisonreed » Fri Oct 08, 2021 5:22 pm

Aebersold, if you don't know anything about jazz
User avatar
Wilktone
Posts: 325
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2018 5:11 pm
Location: Asheville, NC
Contact:

Re: Jazz method book

Post by Wilktone » Mon Oct 11, 2021 8:43 am

What are you looking to work on? The Rochut book, for example, is good for practicing legato and expressive playing in a particular style. If you're wanting to work on something similar, but in a jazz style, pick up a fake book and practice playing ballads.

Mark Nightengale's jazz etude book is good, if you're advanced enough to play them. Any book of trombone transcriptions could also be used to develop your chops while playing in a jazz style, but you'll get more out of it if you transcribe the solos yourself.

For learning to improvise, the Aebersold series are very good practice tools.

Like everything, it will help if you can work on this stuff under the guidance of a teacher.

Dave
David Wilken
www.wilktone.com
User avatar
VJOFan
Posts: 172
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:39 am

Re: Jazz method book

Post by VJOFan » Mon Oct 11, 2021 9:14 am

For technique and chord scale relationships a great (old) text is "jazz Scales for Improvisation" by Dan Haerle

https://www.amazon.ca/Scales-Jazz-Impro ... 0898987059

On the other hand, there are so many things about style that have to be heard to be learned.

This is also true of "classical" music, but is even more important in jazz. The variation in where to play in the beat, the choice of tone colours, the sound of articulations make transcriptions and printed books just a scaffold to begin practice.

Whatever material you choose to put on your stand, listening, with an ear to learning the historic styles of it, will make that stuff even more useful.
Bach5G
Posts: 1503
Joined: Sat Apr 07, 2018 6:10 pm

Re: Jazz method book

Post by Bach5G » Mon Oct 11, 2021 10:55 am

Bob McChesney has a couple of books out that might be of interest to an advanced player interested in jazz improvisation and, well, playing like Bob McChesney;

https://www.bobmcchesney.com/cds---books-
jpwell
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri May 11, 2018 11:52 am

Re: Jazz method book

Post by jpwell » Mon Oct 11, 2021 9:18 pm

I am starting from scratch so all of your help is appreciated.
Thx
Vegasbound
Posts: 576
Joined: Sat Jul 06, 2019 6:11 am

Re: Jazz method book

Post by Vegasbound » Mon Oct 11, 2021 10:36 pm

Kai Winding’s book is good
afugate
Posts: 406
Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 5:47 am
Location: Oklahoma City

Re: Jazz method book

Post by afugate » Tue Oct 12, 2021 5:25 am

jpwell wrote:
Mon Oct 11, 2021 9:18 pm
I am starting from scratch so all of your help is appreciated.
Thx
Your OP indicates you might be a younger player. Here's some "old guy" advice. :idea:

Listen to a lot of the kind of music you're trying to play. But DON'T graze mindlessly from tune to tune. Pick a tune and put it on repeat for a week. Listen and keep finding new nuances, not just with what the bone player(s) is doing. Listen to the rhythm section. Listen to the other players. Listen for the "conversation" that's happening among all the performers in the recording.

--Andy in OKC
User avatar
BGuttman
Posts: 3861
Joined: Thu Mar 22, 2018 7:19 am
Location: Cow Hampshire

Re: Jazz method book

Post by BGuttman » Tue Oct 12, 2021 6:05 am

Andy's advice is spot on (as usual). The people we regard as "greats" today did not have "method books" to work from. They had the standard methods that teach you to play trombone and learned the Jazz part by listening.

That said, there is also a nice book by Mike Lake called "Improvisation Savvy" that can help you work up a decent solo.
Bruce Guttman
Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Orchestra
"Almost Professional"
User avatar
VJOFan
Posts: 172
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2018 11:39 am

Re: Jazz method book

Post by VJOFan » Wed Oct 13, 2021 11:00 am

Listen to a lot of the kind of music you're trying to play. But DON'T graze mindlessly from tune to tune. Pick a tune and put it on repeat for a week. Listen and keep finding new nuances, not just with what the bone player(s) is doing. Listen to the rhythm section. Listen to the other players. Listen for the "conversation" that's happening among all the performers in the recording.

--Andy in OKC

Further to this, see how close to the "original" version of the tune you can get. A lot of standards have long histories and hearing how they evolved is helpful to developing your concept of the tune.
jpwell
Posts: 61
Joined: Fri May 11, 2018 11:52 am

Re: Jazz method book

Post by jpwell » Thu Oct 14, 2021 3:10 pm

Thx all!!

This has opened my eyes to a brand new way of learning jazz.
Post Reply

Return to “Teaching & Learning”