Bach 4C history and usage

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Redthunder
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Location: Philadelphia

Bach 4C history and usage

Post by Redthunder » Sat Jun 16, 2018 9:31 am

Hi all,

I was wondering if anybody knew much about the history of production on the Bach 4C mouthpiece. Does anyone know if there were any Mt. Vernon examples of it, or possibly older? I've seen Corp. models, but nothing older. I'm curious as to when it was introduced into the Bach small bore line of mouthpieces, and whether there were any players that used it.

Thanks!
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BGuttman
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Re: Bach 4C history and usage

Post by BGuttman » Sat Jun 16, 2018 3:00 pm

I use it. I think they started after Mount Vernon. I think mine was from around 1975.

It used to be that small mouthpieces were 12C and 15C. Eventually Bach went to a 7C and introduced the 4C as a "larger" version. Definitely helped us large mouthpiece players (and bass trombone doublers).
Bruce Guttman
Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Orchestra
imsevimse
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Location: Sweden

Re: Bach 4C history and usage

Post by imsevimse » Sun Jun 17, 2018 2:37 pm

At a time I went the "bigger-mouthpiece-is-better" road. Started on a Bach 12C and passed a Bach 7C and a Bach 6 1/2 AL to that Bach 4C. After this I switched to a large bore Conn 88h. First I used an adapter and then felt the mouthpiece was to shallow so I played the original Remington which was about the size of a Bach 5. I finally ended up on a Wick 6BL that did not even fit that Remington taper, but I had no clue about that back then. When I graduated from "The Royal Accademy of Music" I went back to my King 3b and the Bach 12C and used that as my main instrument. I played that setup for about ten years which helped to figure out the fundamentals better.

I have tried the Bach 4C just to figure out what it can do and I can not find any use of it today. It is a to big rim to be effective for lead (for me) and the shallow cup does not give the deeper sound I want from a King 3b or other medium trombone if I would use it to play classical. To me the Bach 4C is odd.

As of curiosity I once owned a Bach 3C. I got it with a trombone I bought. That was a completely hopeless mouthpiece to play. The intonation was so bad. I passed on both the horn and the mouthpiece. I have never heard of a Bach 3C since.

/Tom
"Do your best and then do better" ttf_watermailonman
Redthunder
Posts: 42
Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2018 9:11 pm
Location: Philadelphia

Re: Bach 4C history and usage

Post by Redthunder » Mon Jun 18, 2018 1:40 pm

BGuttman wrote:
Sat Jun 16, 2018 3:00 pm
I use it. I think they started after Mount Vernon. I think mine was from around 1975.

It used to be that small mouthpieces were 12C and 15C. Eventually Bach went to a 7C and introduced the 4C as a "larger" version. Definitely helped us large mouthpiece players (and bass trombone doublers).
In a lucky catch, I just managed to find a Corp (no period) 4C on ebay, in pristine condition. The Corp marking would place the manufacturing period as just after Mt Vernon, in the mid to late 1960's. I'm excited to try it and see how it compares to the ones I have now.
bellend
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Joined: Fri Mar 23, 2018 5:08 am

Re: Bach 4C history and usage

Post by bellend » Wed Jun 20, 2018 9:02 am

The 4 C was definitely made at Mt. Vernon because I had one! which I sold a few years back as I couldn't make it work ( for me)

Years ago when I was involved in making and repairing brass instruments we had a full set of fanfare trumpets from the Royal Air Force central band in for overhaul and two of the tenor models had 4C's in the cases. I could see that working as they make a somewhat brilliant sound.

FWIW

BellEnd
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