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Post by ttf_savio » Thu Mar 19, 2009 7:34 am

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kwj-CZ8lb1g

This one is nice isnt it?.  Strings......go home..... Image
What orchestra is KZN?

Leif
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Post by ttf_WaltTrombone » Thu Mar 19, 2009 7:43 am

I think KZN is the KwaZulu-Natal Orchestra, in South Africa.
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Post by ttf_Silver3B » Thu Mar 19, 2009 9:09 am

QuoteHAHAHAHAHA....

She does has a better tone than me...(sigh)

However, she DOES play a Jupiter like a good young student should!She sounds a heck of lot better than I do!
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Post by ttf_Graham Martin » Thu Mar 19, 2009 7:59 pm

Okay, continuing in my series of posts with videos featuring great contemporary ‘hot’ trombonists, I present Bill Allred. Listen to the ensemble lines as well as the solos:

1982 with Billy Butterfield – “Oh, Baby!”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ms29PweZTGs

Here with Wild Bill Davison in 1986 – “You Took Advantage Of Me”
http://www.dailymotion.com/relevance/se ... viso_music

Bill Allred’s Classic Jazzband from 2005 – “Everybody Loves My Baby”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zjLqWQe9NwY

And  “Panama Rag”:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GdNL9jnRD_M

I know son John is present, also blowing up a storm, on those last tracks but I still reckon dad has the edge. Image

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Post by ttf_anonymous » Fri Mar 20, 2009 1:27 am

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BvP4bWkaFk

Anyone seen this already? Simply inspirational trombone solo.. Image
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Post by ttf_anonymous » Fri Mar 20, 2009 10:16 am

Ray Anderson from a couple of years ago.. looks he's playing a Shires..huh,...who knew?..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PgE8frHTOrQ

Killin..


Wes Funderburk
www.Funderbone.com
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Post by ttf_Malec Heermans » Fri Mar 20, 2009 11:19 am

Quote from: Wes Funderburk on Mar 20, 2009, 10:16AMRay Anderson from a couple of years ago.. looks he's playing a Shires..huh,...who knew?..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PgE8frHTOrQ

Killin..


Wes Funderburk
www.Funderbone.com

BassDrumBone is a really serious trio. I like Ray's playing in that band more than other settings I've heard him in.
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Post by ttf_Graham Martin » Fri Mar 20, 2009 5:43 pm

The last of my top ‘hot’ trombone players. This post featuring Bob Havens.

The Lawrence Welk Show 1964 with Dick Cathcart (trpt) on “Indiana”.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UhAxJrjuf4g

Also The Lawrence Welk Show, but 1965 – “Jazz Me Blues”
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vMND7zNvewc

“Swonderful” from 1971
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YGPb_6AURxw

Here with The Ed Polcer All Stars including Alan Vache and featuring Lino Patruno from 2000. A very swinging extended version of  ”Rosetta”. There is an excellent bio of Bob Havens attached to the YouTube file. 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gnWYQZ7yCVg

Here doing a Teagarden sounding  “Stars Fell On Alabama” in 2007.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VTF-GnWhzRY

Youngsters could do well to listen to Bob’s always perfect tailgate lines and melodic solos. I think I hae mentioned before that, although he is able to do great Jack Teagarden impressions, he is very much his own man in terms of developed style.

Just in case you have not put together the list of my top contemporary ‘hot’ trombone players, here is the list:

Bill Allred
Dan Barrett
Bob Havens
George Masso
Roy Williams

As far as I know, they are all still playing; with Dan Barrett the youngest at 55 years of age. The others have a few years on them, being in their 70s and 80s. They are forever young for me!  My kind of trombone playing! There are many other trombone players from the past that I like but you can still go out and hear these five guys. If you get the chance, DO SO!

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Post by ttf_griffinben » Fri Mar 20, 2009 7:16 pm

Graham, you almost completely copied my list of Bob Havens clips from yesterday on "favorite trombonists"!

OI love Bob havens.  For my money, he is the ONLY guy that took the Teagarden style and developed it into something distinctly his own.  Those clips are a great illustration.  The early 50's stuff has a lot more direct link to Teagarden, but by the 60's he's completely blossomed and has only the tribute, but the style is all his.  That chorus on Jazz Me Blues is one of my favorite hot solos of all time.  I wish I had been there to hear that fat sound live rather than through TV microphones! 

The newer stuff has a lot more Teagarden coming back to it, but its revisited, and informed by his own style as much as Big T's and becomes something new and special.  Check out Hindustan from the same session as Rosetta, he really gets cookin' on the second chorus!:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsKQ7uQGuJc

I don't think is the best representation of Bob's trombone virtuosity, but the ideas are beautifully melodic and the style is fantastic.  BTW there is a another version of




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Post by ttf_Trekkie Trombone » Sat Mar 21, 2009 6:31 pm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AHMix527 ... re=related

Jiggs Whigham Solo.
I get to see him perform next Friday, SO excited!
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Post by ttf_Bellend » Sun Mar 22, 2009 3:56 pm

I can't quite figure out why? but I find myself strangely drawn to this clip  Image  Image  Image  Image  Image  Image

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wq6J4EfM ... L&index=24


BellEnd
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Post by ttf_JacobGarchik » Wed Mar 25, 2009 12:43 pm

Here is a brand new video of my trio live in the studio recording my recent album "Romance".
Looks great in HQ mode.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pHC3gjstiRg

with Dan Weiss on drums and Jacob Sacks on piano
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Post by ttf_richtbone » Fri Mar 27, 2009 12:56 am

Quote from: Trekkie Trombone on Mar 11, 2009, 05:44PMSome Andy Martin:
Oleo:
Head:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ypwZF3Gg ... annel_page
Solo:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eInjEPRU ... annel_page


I happened to be in attendance for this gig here in Portland. Outstanding musicians, it's too bad some of John and Stan's solos weren't posted as well. They more than belonged on stage with Andy, fantastic show, with some of Portland's hidden gems nationally.
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Post by ttf_Andrew Meronek » Fri Mar 27, 2009 1:08 am

This one belongs in the  Image category:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G1yLDVdTSLo

A Bob McChesney combo feature transcribed into Guitar Hero. Image
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Post by ttf_griffinben » Sun Mar 29, 2009 6:44 am

QuoteHere is a brand new video of my trio live in the studio recording my recent album "Romance".
Looks great in HQ mode.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pHC3gjstiRg

with Dan Weiss on drums and Jacob Sacks on piano
Nice.  Bad ass dude!
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Post by ttf_Bellend » Tue Mar 31, 2009 1:22 pm

Sorry if this has been listed before, but I've not noticed to date.

Urbie circa 1976 at Lake Buena Vista Country Club Lounge


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1hNPD6ddIgE



BellEnd
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Post by ttf_Graham Martin » Fri Apr 03, 2009 3:00 am

Some nice Vic Dickenson here from Canada at the end of the 70's. Featured here with Pete Appleyard on vibes, Moe Koffman on soprano sax and a trombone player I don't know but probably should, Ian McDougall. Sweet Georgia Brown:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1KgoVUz2eyk

Hold on, I do remember Ian McDougall from the time he lived in England in the late 50s and was in the Johnny Dankworth band. Nice swinging mainstream style. Also playing lead with Rob McConnell's Boss Brass. Gorgeous tone!!!

And here is Vic Dickenson playing the same tune, but this time with Sidney Bechet and Teddy Buckner from the end of the 50's.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2d6E9TD0Zbs

Sorry Christine, I know you don't like Bechet. But this group has a certain kind of swing, energy and excitement that I find is missing from so much of today's jazz.
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Post by ttf_KevinHickey » Fri Apr 03, 2009 5:06 am

hey thanks for posting that link graham, i had never heard ian mcdougall in the 70's before.

i have never heard of vic before though, my first thought of him was hmm those swing 8ths feel is kinda choppy. i dunno tho  Image
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Post by ttf_Trekkie Trombone » Fri Apr 03, 2009 8:26 am

Quote from: KevinHickey on Apr 03, 2009, 05:06AMhey thanks for posting that link graham, i had never heard ian mcdougall in the 70's before.


Agreed!

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Post by ttf_Graham Martin » Fri Apr 03, 2009 10:03 pm

Quote from: KevinHickey on Apr 03, 2009, 05:06AMhey thanks for posting that link graham, i had never heard ian mcdougall in the 70's before.

i have never heard of vic before though, my first thought of him was hmm those swing 8ths feel is kinda choppy. i dunno tho  Image

I looked up Ian McDougall on the internet and his website is definitely worthwhile visiting, especially the pod sound clips. Like I said previously, he has a beautiful tone:

http://www.ianmcdougall.com/

There is also a nice interview on the British Trombone Society website:

http://www.britishtrombonesociety.org/r ... ugall.html

And of course, I noticed his birth date and have to say that it was a vintage year. Image

Vic Dickenson was one of the pioneers of mainstream jazz in the 50s, with Buck Clayton and others from the Count Basie band:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S6sYIFzphp8

In his day he was considered to have an advanced technique. In fact, JJ studied his style while developing his own. Vic also played a lot with the Eddie Condon band in the 50s and 60s and toured Europe, where he was a bit of a jazz hero, particularly to yours truly. Most references to him seem to suggest that his style is 'humorous'. You can hear a lot of Vic Dickenson in someone like Dan Barrett. 

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Post by ttf_slideorama » Tue Apr 07, 2009 9:20 pm

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Post by ttf_slideorama » Tue Apr 07, 2009 9:25 pm

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Post by ttf_Graham Martin » Wed Apr 08, 2009 6:10 pm

I like this one of Paul Reynolds playing "Black Orpheus".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vNH1rORHgPU

Discovered whilst listening to the Reichenbach Bros. Incidentally, the one with Bill playing Flugelbone(?) on "All The Things You Are" is really good.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n9qiSuLT7CQ

I'm thinking of trading in my valve trombone on one of those. Anybody know what make it is?
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Post by ttf_WaltTrombone » Wed Apr 08, 2009 7:18 pm

Quote from: Graham Martin on Apr 08, 2009, 06:10PMDiscovered whilst listening to the Reichenbach Bros. Incidentally, the one with Bill playing Flugelbone(?) on "All The Things You Are" is really good.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n9qiSuLT7CQ

I'm thinking of trading in my valve trombone on one of those. Anybody know what make it is?

That's a Bach Bass Trumpet.
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Post by ttf_Rob Dorsey » Wed Apr 08, 2009 7:32 pm

Yes, I think you are right and it is a Bach Bass trumpet. I had one for quite a few years and in fact it was the brass horn I played during my time away from the trombone.

Bill gets a good, dead center bass trumpet sound but that sound is why I got rid of mine and bought a Kanstul Flugabone. The Olds, King or Kanstul "marching" instruments have, in my opinion, a much more mellow timbre, not so nasal, and better intonation.

Just an opinion, I could be wrong,
Rob
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Post by ttf_anonymous » Wed Apr 08, 2009 11:06 pm

Quote from: Graham Martin on Apr 08, 2009, 06:10PMI like this one of Paul Reynolds playing "Black Orpheus".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vNH1rORHgPU

Discovered whilst listening to the Reichenbach Bros. Incidentally, the one with Bill playing Flugelbone(?) on "All The Things You Are" is really good.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n9qiSuLT7CQ

I'm thinking of trading in my valve trombone on one of those. Anybody know what make it is?

Thanks for the Black Orpheus vid, I just love that tune.
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Post by ttf_anonymous » Wed Apr 08, 2009 11:26 pm

Quote from: Andrew Meronek on Mar 27, 2009, 01:08AMThis one belongs in the  Image category:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G1yLDVdTSLo

A Bob McChesney combo feature transcribed into Guitar Hero. Image

One word, baby. Blazin'
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Post by ttf_anonymous » Sat Apr 11, 2009 11:29 am

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Post by ttf_Hank Lambert » Mon Apr 13, 2009 10:15 pm

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Post by ttf_anonymous » Tue Apr 14, 2009 12:44 pm

Quote from: Hank Lambert on Apr 13, 2009, 10:15PMhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxUj2fKFX7A
two classics----J & K

how many times has this one shown up here?  that must mean that it's as great as i thought.  long live j and k.

dg
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Post by ttf_Trekkie Trombone » Thu Apr 16, 2009 9:55 am

What a Wonderful World
Delfeayo Marsalis

What do they feed those brothers???

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xN--yTnS ... re=related
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Post by ttf_anonymous » Thu Apr 16, 2009 10:18 am

Quote from: Trekkie Trombone on Apr 16, 2009, 09:55AMWhat a Wonderful World
Delfeayo Marsalis

What do they feed those brothers???

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xN--yTnS ... re=related

Food probably. With a topped with a jazz sauce.
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Post by ttf_sabutin » Thu Apr 16, 2009 10:41 am

Quote from: Trekkie Trombone on Apr 16, 2009, 09:55AMWhat a Wonderful World
Delfeayo Marsalis

What do they feed those brothers???

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xN--yTnS ... re=related

What do they feed them?

Money, among other things. Along with position and power.

Plus of course a shipload of genetically predetermined talent and  a fine musical upbringing and education.

I am not putting them down, here...all can play and play very well...but there is no "magic" in the situation. Apply the same advantages to literally hundreds of musicians that I know in NYC (let alone other thousands in the rest of the world) and you would be wonderingly asking the same question of them.

The position to be able to afford to be an artist at a relatively young age is an incalculable advantage in today's jazz world. The Marsalises have used that advantage very well, and more power to them. Credit their father for that to a large degree. He appears to have had had an almost Joe Kennedy-like vision of where his sons would go, and thirty years or so later...there they are.

Dig it.

You want some "magic"?

How did the Jones brothers make it through 30 or 40 years ago? Thad, Elvin and Hank? Out of the burning ghetto of Detroit? Surviving the viciously tough life of a black jazz musician in the '50s and '60s? All three of them? FUGEDDABOUDIT!!! The Heath brothers too.

You want some miracles?

There they are.

Bet on it.

S.

S.
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Post by ttf_zemry » Thu Apr 16, 2009 5:29 pm

Quote from: sabutin on Apr 16, 2009, 10:41AMWhat do they feed them?

Money, among other things. Along with position and power.

Plus of course a shipload with genetically predetermined talent and  a fine musical upbringing and education.

I go along with the talent, musical upbringing and education part. However, they weren't born with money, position or power. Under any circumstances, money, position nor power can't teach one to play that beautifully.

I was there for that solo. It was a "wow" moment!
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Post by ttf_anonymous » Thu Apr 16, 2009 6:41 pm

QuoteThe position to be able to afford to be an artist at a relatively young age is an incalculable advantage in today's jazz world. The Marsalises have used that advantage very well, and more power to them. Credit their father for that to a large degree. He appears to have had had an almost Joe Kennedy-like vision of where his sons would go, and thirty years or so later...there they are.
There is no doubt that Ellis had the knowledge and experience in the biz, and has skillfully passed it on to his hugely talented and hugely opinionated offspring.
Money, per se, well I dunno about their previous wealth or lack there of. It is a marketing marvel combined with talent as far as I'm concerned. Sam is dead on in the fact that there are thousands as talented with no support system,(money, record label) therefore no success.
Delfeayo sounds great....but he sounds so much like JJ, you can hardly say he is an innovator. The "Music Business" is just that, a business. Sadly, the Music is a small piece of the whole pie.
This should be about creation, not cessation.
We all gotta eat, but the money has sucked the magic away...you dig?


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Post by ttf_sabutin » Thu Apr 16, 2009 7:00 pm

Quote from: zemry on Apr 16, 2009, 05:29PMI go along with the talent, musical upbringing and education part. However, they weren't born with money, position or power. Under any circumstances, money, position nor power can't teach one to play that beautifully.

I was there for that solo. It was a "wow" moment!

I did not say that it can "teach" someone to play that well Zemry, nor did I dispute its "Wowness". I repeat...their position as part of a musical aristocracy in New Orleans, Wynton's breakthrough and the rest of the occurrences that followed are all part of the game. I have seen and heard too many equally talented players (Or even more talented players. Yes, they exist.) forced into decisions that stymied their growth at a place in their lives where they should have been developing their artistic talents and working on their artistic careers.

It's just a fact of life, Zemry.

How they handle it?

That's a whole 'nother story.

My money's on Branford right now.

But what do I know?

S.
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Post by ttf_rodglu » Thu Apr 16, 2009 7:01 pm

"How did the Jones brothers make it through 30 or 40 years ago? Thad, Elvin and Hank? Out of the burning ghetto of Detroit? Surviving the viciously tough life of a black jazz musician in the '50s and '60s? All three of them? FUGEDDABOUDIT!!! The Heath brothers too."

Sam - While I totally agree with your premise, I'd just like to clear up a few facts.  Detroit was not a "burning ghetto" in the 40's, 50's or the 60's.  It was a great place to live and play, and spawned more jazz musicians than any other community during that time period.  Besides the Jones brothers (who were actually from Pontiac, a city approx. 35 miles north of Detroit) there were Tommy Flanagan, Barry Harris, Doug Watkins, Paul Chambers, Curtis Fuller, Yusef Lateef, Sonny Red,.....

Nothing personal - Just sticking up for the 'hood.

Rod
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Post by ttf_sabutin » Thu Apr 16, 2009 7:40 pm

Quote from: rodglu on Apr 16, 2009, 07:01PM"How did the Jones brothers make it through 30 or 40 years ago? Thad, Elvin and Hank? Out of the burning ghetto of Detroit? Surviving the viciously tough life of a black jazz musician in the '50s and '60s? All three of them? FUGEDDABOUDIT!!! The Heath brothers too."

Sam - While I totally agree with your premise, I'd just like to clear up a few facts.  Detroit was not a "burning ghetto" in the 40's, 50's or the 60's.
An unfortunate choice of words, to some degree. In the mid-to-late '60s/early '70s I got a good, up-close-and-personal look in Roxbury, Harlem and Atlantic City at the end of the urban black working class neighborhood culture that had existed at least since the great northward migration of the early 20th century, and I agree that it had its strong points. Nevertheless, the fact remains that the urban riots of the '60s and later had their roots in the viciously segregationist system that had been in place in the U.S. for over 100 years. North and south. All you have to do is read Malcom X's autobiography to understand that fact, and it is my opinion that the black musicians who survived that system relatively sane and came of age in the bebop and post-bebop era were heroes on every level imaginable.

They paid unimaginable dues to follow their artistic dreams. I have lived and traveled with many of them, and that's what I have seen, anyway.

QuoteIt was a great place to live and play, and spawned more jazz musicians than any other community during that time period.  Besides the Jones brothers (who were actually from Pontiac, a city approx. 35 miles north of Detroit) there were Tommy Flanagan, Barry Harris, Doug Watkins, Paul Chambers, Curtis Fuller, Yusef Lateef, Sonny Red.....

Nothing personal - Just sticking up for the 'hood.

Rod
Nothing personal taken, Rod. Storyville was no bed of roses either, nor was the South Bronx, but look at the music that came out of those places.

S.
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Post by ttf_anonymous » Fri Apr 17, 2009 7:13 am

I don't claim to have any great understand of the family, but what I have learned in listening to interviews and through conversation is that there was an environment present in their home that was conducive to encouraging curiosity.  If I recall, Ellis was a school teacher by day and pianist by night.  He worked his behind off.  His children witnessed that and have obviously done the same.  My impression is that music was available, but they were not pushed into jazz.  In an interview on NPR's Fresh Air, Branford indicates that he first chose funk and later chose jazz after hearing Wynton perform with Blakey. 

I am sure that the Marsalis family did what every family should.  They offered a range of interests to their children and encouraged them to attain the highest level of competence, no matter the object of their pursuit. 

The only master plan that I see is that of Columbia Records who saw a legitimate 2 sport star in Wynton and he became the hub of the Marsalis "brand".  To his credit, and the credit of his family, they have continued to pursue excellence in this environment. 

In a long conversation with Dawn Hampton, Slide's older sister, she made things very clear for me.  Her father wanted the best for his family and they started a family band.  She played alto, but is also and amazing dancer.  Check her and Frankie Manning on YouTube.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R7liR0oEzMI  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2M4JX6xOy3Q  She explained that back in that time, black folks didn't have the same career avenues available and entertainment was one that was allowed by the culture.  It seems obvious, except that it helped to hear her perspective. 

Persistence is the recipe. 

DG

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Post by ttf_zemry » Fri Apr 17, 2009 8:53 am

I'm thinking that this solo was before the infamous stare that Delf gave dj for playing trombone from the audience!
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Post by ttf_ctingle » Fri Apr 17, 2009 10:30 am

As I listen to Delfeayo's offering, and read the posts above, I'm thinking:

1) very nice solo, but would we honestly be having this discussion if Delf's last name wasn't Marsalis?  I'm not sure either way, but am somehow doubtful.

2) Wynton was such a strong presence at such an early age in both jazz and classical music - a good looking, well educated, articulate, opinionated, black teenaged son of an esteemed father figure of NOLA's jazz community, whom could hang at the highest levels of postbop and the highest levels of Baroque/Classical.....when it had never been done before at anywhere near that level.....the marketing story wrote itself (and continues to) while Columbia came along and magnified and focused it for the world.  That's what good record labels do, and will continue to do as long as there are record labels.

3) As much as I admire the musicianship of all four Marsalis musician brothers, Branford is the only one who continues to consistently bring the "magic" for me, and in almost any setting he puts himself, but especially his long standing quartet.

4) There are very few acoustic jazz world "EVENTS" left to be put together for concerts and recordings, the kind that get the attention of a broad mainstream audience, but Wynton & Branford together again in front of/along with Herbie, Ron or Dave Holland, and someone like Tain, DeJohnette, or Blade....that would be a must see "EVENT" that would help the whole jazz pie grow in the eyes of the rest of our pop culture world.  It happened originally in the early '80's, and I hope for this again soon down the road for the sake of the music.  Maybe Cassandra Wilson could sing a few tunes in the mix.

5) I liked this one from Dizzy's even more:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DgcHnbUM ... re=related
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Post by ttf_ctingle » Fri Apr 17, 2009 10:36 am

and this solo by Delf even better, not to mention the easily marketable family band:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJY046e- ... re=related
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Post by ttf_ctingle » Fri Apr 17, 2009 10:52 am

Picture this with a more modern rhythm section:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CS-1LTAr ... re=related

Quote from: ctingle on Apr 17, 2009, 10:30AM
4) There are very few acoustic jazz world "EVENTS" left to be put together for concerts and recordings, the kind that get the attention of a broad mainstream audience, but Wynton & Branford together again in front of/along with Herbie, Ron or Dave Holland, and someone like Tain, DeJohnette, or Blade....that would be a must see "EVENT" that would help the whole jazz pie grow in the eyes of the rest of our pop culture world.  It happened originally in the early '80's, and I hope for this again soon down the road for the sake of the music.  Maybe Cassandra Wilson could sing a few tunes in the mix.


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Post by ttf_Graham Martin » Fri Apr 17, 2009 5:14 pm

Quote from: ctingle on Apr 17, 2009, 10:52AMPicture this with a more modern rhythm section:

Gees, you want to kill the swing altogether? I believe that all the brothers in that frontline have huge respect for, and gain a lot of their influence from, the older styles of swing and modern jazz. Their jazz education was obviously comprehensive. For instance, I love to be told by Branford how important is the melody to an improvisation.

That is also why Delfeayo sounds so good on the swinging tune he chose for his feature. I like his solos because he does not try to play like a saxophone. He preserves those special effects you can only execute properly with a trombone, rather than the button instruments played by his brothers.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhsLPxKWuhM

The tune 'Sultry Serenade' with its very basic chord progression and which is ideal for soloing is written by Tyree Glenn, whose influence you can hear right through the performance. Image

Image
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Post by ttf_ntap » Fri Apr 17, 2009 5:58 pm

Quote from: Graham Martin on Apr 17, 2009, 05:14PMGees, you want to kill the swing altogether? I believe that all the brothers in that frontline have huge respect for, and gain a lot of their influence from, the older styles of swing and modern jazz.

I think that the players of this older style were all trying to innovate - at the very least from bebop onward.  The respect that we all have for the older style of swing should also be equated with the respect we should have for innovation, as I believe that was a big part of the past masters' music. 

Guys like Jack DeJohnette, Dave Holland and Herbie are definately at the top - fusing the past with the future.  They all are very innovative and definately swing. 
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Post by ttf_BarryLee » Fri Apr 17, 2009 7:23 pm

More modern, WAY hipper, and almost half a century old:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iedzTRAF ... re=related

Tony Williams always just kills me....
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Post by ttf_ctingle » Fri Apr 17, 2009 8:17 pm

Herbie, Ron/Dave, Tain/DeJohnette/Blade would kill the swing???

Grah, you and I come from two different musical planets.  Two different universes.

Safe travels,
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Post by ttf_ctingle » Fri Apr 17, 2009 8:20 pm

I miss Tony every day!  What a risk taker and unique musician he always was at every stage of his career.

Quote from: BarryLee on Apr 17, 2009, 07:23PMMore modern, WAY hipper, and almost half a century old:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iedzTRAF ... re=related

Tony Williams always just kills me....

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Post by ttf_zemry » Sat Apr 18, 2009 8:05 am

I love Delf's playing on Sultry Seranade. It sounds so trombony! He doesn't try to imitate a sax or trumpet!
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