August Bruhns

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DakoJack
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August Bruhns

Post by DakoJack » Tue Oct 01, 2019 9:39 pm

August Bruhns????
What does everyone know about him all I really know is that he was famous for playing the David Concertino and I believe played it at Davids funeral ,but I'd like clarifacation on that and any other knowledge that you may know.
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LeTromboniste
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Re: August Bruhns

Post by LeTromboniste » Wed Oct 02, 2019 12:50 pm

Try searching with alternative spellings. I.e. Bruns.

He was trombonist of the Kapelle of Dresden from 1861 to 1892. One of his sons became principal trombone there in 1901, and stayed until WW2.

He did apparently play the David at the Gewandhaus in 1873 (the year of David's death), but I don't find info about playing at the funeral. I had read somewhere that the funeral march from the concertino was played on violin at that occasion, but then again that was right next to a totally unsubstantiated and dubious claim that Mendelssohn was supposed to compose the piece originally, so it's not worth much. So if you have info about Bruns playing at the funeral that would be very interesting information!
Maximilien Brisson
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DakoJack
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Re: August Bruhns

Post by DakoJack » Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:47 pm

LeTromboniste wrote:
Wed Oct 02, 2019 12:50 pm
Try searching with alternative spellings. I.e. Bruns.

He was trombonist of the Kapelle of Dresden from 1861 to 1892. One of his sons became principal trombone there in 1901, and stayed until WW2.

He did apparently play the David at the Gewandhaus in 1873 (the year of David's death), but I don't find info about playing at the funeral. I had read somewhere that the funeral march from the concertino was played on violin at that occasion, but then again that was right next to a totally unsubstantiated and dubious claim that Mendelssohn was supposed to compose the piece originally, so it's not worth much. So if you have info about Bruns playing at the funeral that would be very interesting information!
Thanks for the bread crumbs I'll continue to investigate upon further research I'm having trouble tying hime to the actual funeral perhaps I mistaked the Gewandhaus for his actual funeral. Thank you so musch for your input im concidering doing some scholarly research on this.
Retrobone
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Re: August Bruhns

Post by Retrobone » Sun May 31, 2020 2:46 pm

Maybe this would interest you...a contemporary review of a performance by Bruns in Hamburg quoted in my research into the Leipzig trombone builders Sattler and Penzel

https://www.researchcatalogue.net/view/360420/360442

“The famous trombone of the lamented Queisser of Leipzig has come into the hands of the great master’s thoroughly worthy successor, the trombonist Bruns, of the Hamburg City Theater.... we noticed this young artist after he performed an aria form Rossini’s Stabat Mater and a “Lied” by Belcke with organ accompaniment in the Jacobi-Kirche... Queisser’s trombone, made of heavy silver brass, (the thin metal makes too much noise) displays an especially rich, soft tone. It was in very safe hands, and when through the humidity of the breath, when one blows into it, the inner silver oxidises, the tone becomes progressively softer and nobler, but loses its stability and projection in later years....

We heard a certain Saxon here, Nabich, several years ago. He came from London calling himself the Non Plus Ultra of trombonists, and also had an excellent instrument. What an enormous power we heard on this trombone. He also trilled not in whole tones but in minor thirds, and his sound was not particularly round...

What a difference to hear our Hamburg trombonist last Monday in the Jacobi Kirche. The higher notes could be exchanged with a horn and the possession of an excellent well schooled breathing technique allows Bruns to perform melodies on this powerful instrument with elegance and lightness. The brilliant breath control was laid bare with a minute long trill in piano with crescendo and diminuendo, whereby we could scarcely believe what a human chest could achieve. Respect for such an instrument, such a virtuoso.”
Tim Dowling
Principal trombonist, Residentie Orchestra, The Hague
Teacher, Royal Conservatorium, The Hague
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DakoJack
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Re: August Bruhns

Post by DakoJack » Sun May 31, 2020 11:51 pm

Retrobone wrote:
Sun May 31, 2020 2:46 pm
Maybe this would interest you...a contemporary review of a performance by Bruns in Hamburg quoted in my research into the Leipzig trombone builders Sattler and Penzel

https://www.researchcatalogue.net/view/360420/360442

“The famous trombone of the lamented Queisser of Leipzig has come into the hands of the great master’s thoroughly worthy successor, the trombonist Bruns, of the Hamburg City Theater.... we noticed this young artist after he performed an aria form Rossini’s Stabat Mater and a “Lied” by Belcke with organ accompaniment in the Jacobi-Kirche... Queisser’s trombone, made of heavy silver brass, (the thin metal makes too much noise) displays an especially rich, soft tone. It was in very safe hands, and when through the humidity of the breath, when one blows into it, the inner silver oxidises, the tone becomes progressively softer and nobler, but loses its stability and projection in later years....

We heard a certain Saxon here, Nabich, several years ago. He came from London calling himself the Non Plus Ultra of trombonists, and also had an excellent instrument. What an enormous power we heard on this trombone. He also trilled not in whole tones but in minor thirds, and his sound was not particularly round...

What a difference to hear our Hamburg trombonist last Monday in the Jacobi Kirche. The higher notes could be exchanged with a horn and the possession of an excellent well schooled breathing technique allows Bruns to perform melodies on this powerful instrument with elegance and lightness. The brilliant breath control was laid bare with a minute long trill in piano with crescendo and diminuendo, whereby we could scarcely believe what a human chest could achieve. Respect for such an instrument, such a virtuoso.”
This is great stuff I need to get back to this research thank you so much for the info.
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