First Things First - Frank Gulino

How and what to teach and learn.
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Zandit75
Posts: 45
Joined: Mon Apr 30, 2018 9:34 pm

First Things First - Frank Gulino

Post by Zandit75 » Mon May 07, 2018 12:34 am

Not sure how many of you have come across this piece, it was only released last year, however I've been playing it for the last couple of weeks, and really loving it.
I'm having trouble with a couple of the lower pedal notes, namely the Gb and Fb.
Is there a chart somewhere that illustrates recommended positions or valve combinations for this lower register?

For those who haven't heard this before, please enjoy!
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BGuttman
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Location: Cow Hampshire

Re: First Things First - Frank Gulino

Post by BGuttman » Mon May 07, 2018 3:40 am

Pedal Fb? You mean pedal E?

Pedal notes should be in the same positions as the notes an octave higher. I definitely try to play E in T2 just because of the very long reach to get to 7.

I play a version of the Remington exercise (I think it's #1) where I play pedal Bb, pedal A, pedal Bb; then pedal Bb, pedal Ab, pedal Bb, etc. If I'm really in good shape I can play that exercise starting on T1 (going out along the trigger register).

Btw, your video seems to have some restrictions. Could you just give a link instead?
Bruce Guttman
Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Orchestra
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Zandit75
Posts: 45
Joined: Mon Apr 30, 2018 9:34 pm

Re: First Things First - Frank Gulino

Post by Zandit75 » Mon May 07, 2018 5:15 am

Thanks BGuttman.
The piece is written in an open key, so all accidentals are written on each note. The note is actually written as a pedal Fb, hence why I wrote it that way, but you are correct.
I wasn't sure if using the first trigger would work with the pedals, so I start working on the exercises you mentioned.
In regards to the video, All I posted was the page link, and that' how it appeared automatically.
If you click the blue tab that says "Watch on Vimeo", it will take you directly there.
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